QuickPlan

One aspect on the Mac that has always been a problem is the lack of support for MS Project. There are a few alternatives but they are prohibitively expensive for personal use. QuickPlan is nowhere near as feature rich and capable as MS Projects, but it is cheap, and I find that it meets the majority of my project planning needs. Resource management and project scheduling are all easy to configure and control and visually quite stunning, something MS project struggles with at times. I’ve been using it for about 4 months now and it’s become my planning staple. I often plan out team activities and dump the output to PDF. I find this doesn’t have any problems especially when you consider most business users won’t have MS project licenses and so could see an MS project anyway. Of course you forfeit the ability to save to Sharepoint or Teams but having a PDF for reference is easily good enough. The other advantage is having the QuickPlan app on the App Store. If you’re a heavy Mac user and looking for an excellent Mac project management tool then this is the one to have.

Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code is a butterfly that’s been an ugly catepillar for way too long. I’ve tried it a few times over the years but always been disappointed. However, after a long road we finally have a fully featured and adaptable code editor. The ability to edit remote files via SFTP, and/or SSH. Plus the ability to configure the numerous coded syntax checkers and code validation tools plugins is excellent. You’ve the option of leaving it as light or heavy as you wish. I started with just using the basic client without any plugins and still found it light and user friendly. Over time I added plugins as needed and have built up a test solution and validation/verification tool which I doubt I could find as feature rich anywhere else.
Integration with Team Foundation Server and GIT is absolutely a dream come true. So easy and helpful. It’s hard to consider that this was derived from a windows code editing suite. It works and fits so well with C on a Ubuntu Linux server, an apache PHP web server, C# application development, and Bash/Java scripting. It fits with any coding language I’ve tried. Definitely my client of choice.